The Rude Puppet Mr. Bungle Teaches Kids Lunchroom Manners (1959)


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Beginning Responsibility: Lunchroom Manners (IMDB)

VOTE ON S.I.A. POLLS IN MANNERS

Transcription:

Beginning Reponsibility Lunchroom Manners Video Title Screen

Just before lunch one day, a puppet show was put on at school. It was called “Mr. Bungle Goes to Lunch”.

It was fun to watch.

In the puppet show, Mr. Bungle came to the boys’ room on his way to lunch.

He looked at his hands. His hands were dirty. And, his hair was messy. But, Mr. Bungle didn’t stop to wash his hands or comb his hair. He went right to lunch.

Then, instead of getting into line at the lunchroom, Mr. Bungle pushed everyone aside and went right to the front.

Even though this made the children laugh, no one thought that was the fair thing to do.

Then, in the lunchroom, Mr. Bungle was so clumsy and impolite that he knocked over everything, and no one wanted to sit next to him.

And when he finally knocked his own tray off the table, that was the end of the puppet show.

The children knew that even though Mr. Bungle was funny to watch, he wouldn’t be much fun to eat with.

Phil knew that Mr. Bungle wouldn’t have many friends. He wouldn’t want to be like Mr. Bungle.

Later, Miss Brown said it was time for the children who ate in the cafeteria to go to lunch. She hoped there weren’t any Mr. Bungles in this room.

Phil stopped to return a book to Miss Brown while his friends went on to the lunchroom. He would have to catch up with them later.

On his way to catch up with his friends, Phil almost walked past the boys’ room, but he stopped and thought. Were his hands clean? No, they were a little dirty.

Phil remembered that Mr. Bungle didn’t wash his hands. Mr. Bungle’s hair was messy, too. Phil didn’t want to be like Mr. Bungle.

Inside the boys’ room, Phil was surprised to see some of his friends washing their hands, too.

Phil washed his hands well, with lots of soap.

Then he rinsed the soap off.

Phil dried his hands well, too. When he was finished, he threw the paper towel in the basket where it belonged, and then he made sure his hair looked neat.

Now, Phil and his friends were ready for lunch.

Mr Bungle rudely pushing and cutting in line in the lunchroom

There was a line of children waiting to get into the lunchroom when Phil got there.

He saw some boys he knew at the front of the line. They waved for him to go up to the front with them.

But, Phil didn’t want to break into line as Mr. Bungle did.

So Phil went to the end. That was the fair thing to do. He would see his other friends inside the lunchroom.

The line moved very fast, and soon Phil was inside. First, he picked up his tray.

Then, he got his silverware. He put his knife, fork, and spoon neatly on the tray.

And then he slid his tray along.

He always enjoyed looking at the good food in the cafeteria. It tasted good and was good for him, too.

Instead of having a sandwich today, Phil decided to take the hot lunch.

Phil took some bread and butter, too. And he knew what else he wanted – milk!

But Alice took the last carton on the tray.

Maybe there was more milk. So he said, “May I please have some milk?”

Phil remembered to say “May I?” and “please?” That was very polite. Yes, there was more milk.

Phil remembered to say “Thank you” when he took the carton of milk.

Phil had good manners. He didn’t want to be like Mr. Bungle in the lunchroom.

Phil didn’t want to forget his dessert. The cake looked delicious.

At the end of the line, the lunchroom supervisor said she had noticed how polite Phil was, and she smiled at him. She wouldn’t smile at a Mr. Bungle.

Phil went to the table where his friends were. He put his tray down carefully, pulled out his chair quietly, and sat down. He knew his friends wouldn’t like a noisy Mr. Bungle at their table.

There was someone Phil liked – Freddie. He always brought his lunch from home. It looked good. Freddie had a sandwich, an apple, a cookie, and milk.

Before Phil began to eat, he always put a napkin on his lap. So did Freddie.

Everyone liked Freddie. He was